Archive for January, 2010

Nutrition Quiz

The Detroit Free Press published a great Nutrition Quiz this week about that hard-to-pronounce grain – quinoa. We at Operation Frontline are infatuated with the little pseudocereal, often pairing it with the Ratatouille recipe in our classes.

So why is quinoa so great? According to quinoa.net (is there really a quinoa.net?),

1. It’s a VEGETARIAN solution, a balanced-amino-acid source of high quality protein.

2. It’s a SENIOR solution, a high-iron food that raises the hematocrit, delivers more oxygen to the brain, fights senility.

3. It’s a DIABETIC solution, a very low-glycemic-index cereal type food.

4. It’s a TASTE SOLUTION, quite delicious.

The president of the Quinoa Corporation, named Gorad, raves about the properties of the food, saying,

“Quinoa’s most pragmatic quality,” observed Gorad, “is that it’s a basic food with strong earth energy. People who try it categorically respond, ‘This tastes good!”

If you’ve never tried quinoa, this website has some great recipes. The Closet Cooking blog also has some delicious quiona recipes.

Now to test your knowledge -

1. First, some history: Where is the grain grown, and which ancient civilization first harvested it?

a) The Mayans in Mexico

b) The Incas in the Bolivian Andes

c) The Sudanese in the Sahara

2. How do you pronounce quinoa?

a) “Kwin-oh-ah”

b) “Co-in-ah”

c) “Keen-wa”

3. How much more of the daily value of protein does quinoa contain than whole wheat and rice, respectively?

a) 4.2% and 8.7%

b) 9.6% and 12.3%

c) 19.0% and 22.4%

4. Quinoa is significantly higher than whole wheat in lysine, an amino acid. Among other uses, the nutrient-absorbing lysine has been used for which condition?

a) Warts

b) Psoriasis

c) Herpes

For the answers, click here.

January 28, 2010 at 8:49 pm Leave a comment

Marsha's Story

With five kids, Marsha Kozmor never seems to slow down. Not only is she a busy mom, she has also been involved in her community, a small town just south of Detroit. “I’m on the School Board… I’m the vice president for the PTO for the middle school, and then we have a neighborhood team that runs the Girl Scouts for this area, and I’m on the team. I’ve been a Girl Scout leader for 15 years.”

With her family on the go so often, it has been difficult to insist on healthy eating and home-cooked meals. “Well, [mealtimes are] always hectic, just because we’re involved in a lot. I work a lot in the community …so we do eat on the run a lot, and so we eat a lot more junk.”

With so many mouths to feed and on a limited budget, Marsha has learned the value of being thrifty: “I’ve always been a real shopper…, just because I’ve had to be, because of my husband’s income…”

After taking a nutrition and cooking class with Operation Frontline, a program through Gleaners Community Food Bank and Share Our Strength, Marsha noted a distinct change in her family’s eating and shopping habits. Three of her daughters, her twin 12-year-olds and her 16-year-old, were able to take the class with her, learning how to cook healthy meals alongside their mom.

Her 16-year-old daughter has even helped her to cook dinner since taking the class, preparing a Macaroni and Cheese recipe in the Operation Frontline cookbook. “I had to leave, so I gave her the stuff, and I went grocery shopping. I said, ‘Guys, it’s either that or you’re not getting no food.’ She did, and it came out really good! She made the whole thing! She made the whole dinner by herself!”

For Marsha, extra help from her daughters has been a godsend in the kitchen, especially with their busy schedule.  On top of her community work, Marsha has also decided to go back to school, working on a degree in Information Insurance. Although her schedule is packed with obligations, Marsha noted that preparing meals and grocery shopping has become more of a family affair: “[We] went grocery shopping a couple of days ago, and I made them pull out the labels and start reading them… We did this all through the grocery store… ‘OK, we got these eggs. There’s a dozen for $0.99 or you could buy 18 for $1.49.’ …I think it’s a good lesson. You know, I really do.”

Marsha has not only encouraged her own family to adopt the principles in the Operation Frontline curriculum, she has also set up classes for other families in her Girl Scout troop, so that they could learn about food budgeting and nutritious foods as well. She credits the class with helping her family to slow down and spend more time together, saying, “We’re trying – we’ve had a few more meals together. We really try and do that together. Sometimes it might be sitting together in the living room, but we try.”

A few girls from Marsha's Girl Scout troop in our Side By Side class with Chef Vince

January 8, 2010 at 7:37 pm Leave a comment


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 50 other followers

Cooking Matters Twitter Feed

USDA Statement

This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. This work is supported in part by the Michigan Department of Human Services, under contract number ADMIN-10-99011. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Michigan Fitness Foundation or the Michigan Department of Human Services. In accordance with Federal law and USDA policy, these institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720- 6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more contact the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline at (855) ASK-MICH. Space-Limited USDA/DHS/MNN Credit Statement This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. These institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. People who need help buying nutritious food for a better diet call the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline: (855) ASK-MICH.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 50 other followers