Archive for March, 2012

Volunteer spotlight: Henriette Hajjar

From left, Sarah Noureddine, Dorothy Hernandez, Henriette Hajjar and Sahar Rida. Sarah and Sahar were the volunteer nutrition educators and Henriette was the volunteer chef for a recent class at ACCESS. I couldn't have done this class without this amazing volunteer team!


Chef volunteer Henriette Hajjar brings to Cooking Matters her fusion style of cooking, her boundless energy and her passion for helping the community. She signed up to volunteer just a couple of months ago and is already teaching her second class.
When asked why she got involved, she says, “I felt responsible to answer the call and go for it and help. It is beautiful to give and share the gift that you have been blessed with, especially when you share it with someone who doesn’t have it and this is why I did decide to get involved in Cooking Matters.”
Not only is the caterer working on a new restaurant as well as volunteering with Chefs Move to Schools, she is also a mom. The busy chef took a break to answer some of our questions.

You have lived in many different parts of the world. Can you tell us a little about where you have lived and how and when you ended up in Michigan? Where are you originally from?
Aleppo (Syria – Middle East ) is my home town, where I was born to an Italian Armenian Mom and Palestinian Dad ……. I lived in Syria for a while then the family decided to move to Turkey, where i learned a lot about their cuisine and the fantastic authentic food that they have. Also I lived in Athens, Greece, where I felt in love with their cooking and the simple dishes that they have. Then I lived in Jordan for a while there too. That was my last station before I moved permanently to Michigan when I got married and I had to follow my heart and settle down in Michigan, which I love a lot.

When did you start cooking? Why did you go into culinary arts?
My love of food began when I was a child, as I grew up in a family filled with cooking and parties … I was born and raised in an Arabic/Italian/Armenian family where food is one of the most important pillars in the family and community. I hold my mother responsible for inspiring me to become a chef. She loved my way and insisted to let me help and cook for the family so every weekend my duty in the house was to go shopping for groceries with my mom and come home, clean, cut, organize and cook for family and friends. Having a restaurant business in my mom’s family made it easy for me to go and help on the weekend and after school. My love for cooking was so obvious to everybody in the family .

Tell us a little bit about your restaurant and the plans for your next restaurant.
My previous restaurant, Flairs Mediterranean Fusion, is a new generation of Mediterranean food (Fusion): balanced, fresh and very high-quality ingredients in a comfortable atmosphere. Our menu covered the Mediterranean region fusing Italian, French, Moroccan, Armenian, Middle Eastern, Greek and more.

The new restaurant that I am working on is Skewers Plus: the whole idea is to go fresh and healthy with natural cooking on the charcoal for simple and delicious food.

I know you are involved with the Chefs Move to Schools initiative. At which school do you work? How long have you been involved? What does your work there entail? What are the future plans/goals?

I am at Deerfield Elementary School in Novi. I have been involved in Chefs Move to Schools since 2011. What I do is prepare the dish that the students are going to try for that specific day, introducing the new MyPlate, talk about a new healthy way of eating, educate them nutritionally, let them try the sample that we made and see their reaction to the new food that we are presenting that day.

Why did you decided to get involved in Cooking Matters?

As an active member in my community I felt responsible to answer the call and go for it and help. It is beautiful to give and share the gift that you have been blessed with, especially when you share it with someone who doesn’t have it and this is why I did decide to get involved in Cooking Matters. Helping others and seeing them happy makes me happy too.

What do you like best about volunteering?

In my volunteering I am learning a lot as much as I am teaching. I love meeting new people, being exposed to a different environment, and seeing the others happy for what I give.

Is there a specific moment or highlight from a class you have done so far that is most memorable to you?

Yes ….my previous class (at ACCESS) was hilarious, loved the group and their culture and the funny thing … is they were so excited to cut and chop and prep the food even before me explaining what we need to do … I had a great time.

Can you share with us your favorite healthy, budget-friendly recipe with us?

Simple Tomato Sauce
Preparation Time: 10 min
Cooking Time: 15 min
Ingredients
• 2 cups chopped tomato
• 1 teaspoon basil, chiffonade
• 1/2 teaspoon garlic
• 1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning
• 1/3 teaspoon black pepper
• 1/3 teaspoon salt
• 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
• ½ cup of parmesan cheese
• Enough wheat pasta for two

Instructions
1. Put olive oil and garlic in pan. Cook on medium heat until garlic is slightly brown.
2. Add chopped tomato, basil, Italian seasoning, black pepper and salt.
3. Cook on medium heat for about 15 minutes.
4. Cook pasta according to package directions.
5. Add cooked pasta to the tomato sauce and stir for couple of minutes.
6. Serve hot with sprinkle of parmesan cheese.

March 14, 2012 at 9:51 am Leave a comment

Meet the newest Cooking Matters coordinator, Vani Sohikian


Still only 23 going on 24 (her birthday is in a couple of weeks), Vani Sohikian has already worked at the top levels of food policy, to interning at the USDA to working in U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow’s office.
But the public health professional believes it’s work at the ground level that matters, which brought the Dearborn native to Cooking Matters.
Vani is our newest Cooking Matters coordinator. Along with coordinating classes, she will also be the main point of contact for volunteers in terms of recruitment and training.
The Dearborn native earned her bachelor’s degree in anthropology and zoology. During her undergrad studies, which she says were heavily nutrition-based and offered her a different perspective on the field, she partnered up with a professor of nutrition evolution. This experience led her to pursue her master’s in public health.
It was during her master’s program that she worked with the USDA as an intern in the child nutrition division in summer 2010.
She worked primarily on HealthierUS School Challenge, which is part of first lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign.
Vani explained the HealthierUS School Challenge is a voluntary initiative to make schools a healthier environment for the students in a variety of ways, from making lunch menus healthier, offering fruits and vegetables every day, serving whole grains, cutting out convenience foods such as chips and other snacks and including nutrition education and physical education. Schools who meet these criteria are then awarded designations from bronze to gold.
Her duties entailed reviewing applications and updating the website, on which she would post tips from gold-designated healthy schools.
It was during this internship that she started to question the legislative process. Her next internship brought her to Sen. Stabenow’s office. During her time there, not a lot of major legislation was pushed through and she saw firsthand the role partisan politics can play in constraining the process.
As a coordinator of Cooking Matters, she says she gets to see impact of her work immediately.
“Telling someone how to eat healthier and see look on their face, it’s really rewarding,” she says.
“It’s really exciting to give (participants) simple tips and see how that can change a person’s view,” she said, adding “it’s exciting to see a whole staff passionate about what they do.”
Her goal as a Cooking Matters coordinator is to reach those who may be reluctant to sign up for a Cooking Matters class.
“There is a big population who aren’t willing to take it but would really benefit,” she says. “We are not reaching this audience.”
When she is not thinking about how she can play a major role in finding innovative solutions on solving hunger and obesity from a public health perspective, she likes to play tennis and is starting to cook more and experiment in the kitchen.
She says she’s learned that life doesn’t always turn out according to plan (“I thought I would end up at the USDA”) so for right now she is focused on doing “whatever I can to maximize reach to people. The goal is to see food access, obesity and hunger not be major issues.”

March 13, 2012 at 10:38 pm Leave a comment


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USDA Statement

This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. This work is supported in part by the Michigan Department of Human Services, under contract number ADMIN-10-99011. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Michigan Fitness Foundation or the Michigan Department of Human Services. In accordance with Federal law and USDA policy, these institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720- 6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more contact the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline at (855) ASK-MICH. Space-Limited USDA/DHS/MNN Credit Statement This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. These institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. People who need help buying nutritious food for a better diet call the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline: (855) ASK-MICH.

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