Portion Distortion: How Much You Should Really Be Eating

February 25, 2010 at 8:49 pm Leave a comment

One of the main themes that we talk about in our Operation Frontline classes is appropriate portion sizes. In the past twenty years, portion sizes in restaurants and in grocery stores have bulked up a bit, from muffins to soda to the size of our dinner plates. As a result, we not only eat more, we buy more. Needless to say, we as a nation have a bit of a weight problem, not to mention other health issues such as Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

 

To help you visualize this portion distortion, Divine Caroline had a great series of photos. Here are a few:

 
Photo Credit: Divine Caroline

To burn off the extra 145 calries you gained just by choosing the 20 oz. bottle over the 8 oz. bottle, you would have to walk up and down stairs for about 30 minutes.

Photo Credit: Divine Caroline

To burn off the 360 calorie difference between these two tubs of popcorn, you would have to play basketball for about 45 minutes.

Do we have you convinced?

You can take the Portion Distortion quiz here to test your knowledge on portion sizes and how they have changed in the past twenty years.

To learn more about portion sizes and food labeling that appear on the products you buy, check out this video put out by The New York Times.

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USDA Statement

This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. This work is supported in part by the Michigan Department of Human Services, under contract number ADMIN-10-99011. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Michigan Fitness Foundation or the Michigan Department of Human Services. In accordance with Federal law and USDA policy, these institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720- 6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more contact the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline at (855) ASK-MICH. Space-Limited USDA/DHS/MNN Credit Statement This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. These institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. People who need help buying nutritious food for a better diet call the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline: (855) ASK-MICH.

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