Archive for October, 2013

Volunteer Spotlight: Haley Mullins

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Tell us a little about yourself.

I graduated from college about five years ago with a degree in business administration.  After graduation, I traveled in Australia and worked in fine dining.  That’s where my love of food really started.  Later, I returned to the states, lived Lake Tahoe for a couple of years bartending at a mountainside resort and ended up moving to St. Louis, MO to be closer to home and help out with family.  I realized that finance wasn’t what I was interested in, so I decided to go back to school to become an R.D.

When did you first become interested in nutrition?

I started eating healthy and working out in St. Louis and really experienced an “ah ha” moment.  I felt better than I had in 5 or 6 years, and realized it was because I was eating natural, unprocessed foods.  I became really curious about the science behind the changes I was feeling.

How did you first start volunteering with Cooking Matters?

I got involved in St. Louis.  A regular at the bar where I was working told me about the program.  I wanted to volunteer in some way related to nutrition or food and not take food and nourishment for granted.  I was also interested in providing a way for people to help themselves when facing food shortages.

Have you noticed any big differences since you moved and started volunteering in Detroit?

Nothing huge.  Everyone has that base level curiosity. Everyone all over the country is looking for the same thing.  They want to eat healthy and feel better.  So many people want to change, they just need to learn how.

What is your favorite thing about being a Cooking Matters volunteer?

For me, it’s seeing the students take in the information one week and come back the next with really awesome, insightful questions.  It’s so amazing to know that they are taking it to the next level.

What’s your favorite vegetable?

Beets.  I love how sweet and versatile they are.

Do you have a recipe that you’d like to share?

Here’s one of my go-to recipes. I LOVE making soup in the winter because you can easily make a ton of it and then freeze the leftovers. When I freeze it, I will freeze it in 2 serving units in plastic bags so I only have to defrost enough for one person when I am ready to eat it again.

Southwest Chicken Soup

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon olive oil1 onion, chopped3 cloves garlic, minced

2 teaspoons chili powder

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 (28 ounce) can canned crushed

tomatoes

1 (14 ounce) can low-sodium chicken broth

1/2 cup water

1 (10 ounce) package frozen corn

1 (4 ounce) can chopped green chiles

1 (15 ounce) can black beans

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

2 cups shredded chicken

Optional toppings: crushed tortilla chips,

shredded Monterey Jack cheese, sliced

green onions

Directions:

1. In a medium stock pot, heat oil over medium heat. Cook   onion and garlic in oil until soft. Stir in chili powder, oregano, tomatoes,   broth, and water. Bring to a boil, and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes.
2. Stir in corn, chiles, beans, cilantro, and chicken.   Simmer for 10 minutes.
3. Ladle soup into individual serving bowls. Serve with   optional toppings, if desired.
Recipe adapted from Allrecipes.com
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October 21, 2013 at 10:44 am Leave a comment


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USDA Statement

This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. This work is supported in part by the Michigan Department of Human Services, under contract number ADMIN-10-99011. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Michigan Fitness Foundation or the Michigan Department of Human Services. In accordance with Federal law and USDA policy, these institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720- 6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more contact the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline at (855) ASK-MICH. Space-Limited USDA/DHS/MNN Credit Statement This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. These institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. People who need help buying nutritious food for a better diet call the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline: (855) ASK-MICH.