Volunteer Spotlight: Stacy Miller

March 1, 2016 at 12:41 pm Leave a comment

Stacy Miller

Tell us a little about yourself.

I am a mother and my children are grown. I have been in the food industry all of my adult life.  A few years ago I watched a movie called A Place at the Table that totally changed the way I think about everything related to food. That’s how I found out about Gleaners and the Cooking Matters program.  I know about food, am good with people, and have time to volunteer, so I was hoping I could make a difference.

When did you first get involved in the food industry?

My first job was at the local Dairy Queen when I was 13 years old.  I saw other kids my age working there and asked how they were able to get a job when they were so young.  They told me to go to the counseling office to get a green card saying my grades were high enough to handle working and studying.   I wanted a job to make money, so I did it.  It’s been a natural progression from there.  I moved on to dishwashing, waitressing, and cooking.  I went to culinary school to study cakes and pastries.  I have one more semester left to finish my degree.  Right now I’m a cake decorator for Costco.  Once I started working around food, I never stopped except to focus on photography for three years – but depending on what you photograph that could be food related too!

What ingredients do you always have in your kitchen?

A wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and Greek yogurt.  I was a vegetarian for several years before I slowly started reincorporating meat into my diet, but mostly we eat fruits and vegetables at home.

What is your favorite thing about volunteering with Cooking Matters?

I’m volunteering in my 4th Cooking Matters class and have worked with teens, middle school students, and now kids in the 3rd to 5th grades.  I like seeing kids try to eat stuff that they’ve never seen before.  Some of them are convinced that they won’t like certain things, but when they taste them they get it right away.

 

Is there a recipe that you would like to share?

One of my favorites is actually a Cooking Matters recipe: Southwestern Black-eyed Pea and Corn Salad.  I like to change it up depending on what I have on hand; it’s so easy.  I’ve started taking this salad to parties when I know that the only food options will be hamburgers, hotdogs, and desserts.

 

Southwestern Black-eyed Pea and Corn Salad

Serves 10, 3/4 cup per serving

 

Ingredients

1 medium bell pepper

1 small red onion

2 (15½ ounce) cans black-eyed peas

1 (15¼ ounce) can corn kernels, no salt added

3 Tablespoons canola oil

2 Tablespoons vinegar

1 teaspoon cumin

¼ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon ground black pepper

Optional Ingredients:

¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves

 

Materials

Can opener

Colander

Cutting board

Large bowl

Measuring spoons

Mixing spoon

Sharp knife

 

Instructions

  1. Rinse and dice bell pepper, removing core and seeds. Peel, rinse, and dice onion.
  2. If using, rinse and chop cilantro leaves.
  3. In a colander, drain and rinse black-eyed peas and corn.
  4. In a large bowl, add pepper, onion, peas, corn, cilantro if using, and remaining ingredients. Mix well.

Chef’s Notes

Dried black-eyed peas may be cheaper than canned. If using dried, cook according to package directions until peas are soft but not mushy. Drain, rinse, and add 3 cups cooked peas to salad. Use leftovers in other recipes later in the week.

Try chilling the salad. Serve it over cooked spinach or kale.

Use any type of vinegar you have on hand. Try balsamic, cider, or red or white wine vinegar.

Use black beans in place of black-eyed peas if you like.

When corn is in season, use fresh in place of canned. Cook 4 medium ears corn. Remove kernels from cob with a knife. Add to salad.

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Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

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USDA Statement

This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. This work is supported in part by the Michigan Department of Human Services, under contract number ADMIN-10-99011. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Michigan Fitness Foundation or the Michigan Department of Human Services. In accordance with Federal law and USDA policy, these institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720- 6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more contact the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline at (855) ASK-MICH. Space-Limited USDA/DHS/MNN Credit Statement This material was partially funded by the State of Michigan with federal funds from the United States Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by way of the Michigan Nutrition Network at the Michigan Fitness Foundation. These institutions are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. People who need help buying nutritious food for a better diet call the toll free Michigan Food Assistance Program Hotline: (855) ASK-MICH.

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